Court of the Patriarchs Viewpoint short hike Zion National Park Utah Trail

The Court of the Patriarchs is considered the shortest trail in Zion National Park, and in truth it barely qualifies as a hike. You will probably walk farther to get from your car to the shuttle at the park visitor center than you will to get to the end of this trail.

From the Court of the Patriarchs shuttle stop, head east up the paved trail to the viewpoint. The hike takes a minute to ascend 40 feet to a short rise in the bottom of Zion Canyon. The spot is just high enough to get a view over the trees at the surrounding mountains and canyon walls.

Patriarchs Peaks Zion
Looking down the trail at a peak south of the Patriarchs
Patriarchs Peaks Zion
Looking up at the Patriarchs

The Patriarchs are three neighboring sandstone peaks on the west side of Zion Canyon. Each is named after biblical fathers. From left to right (south to north) they are Abraham Peak, Isaac Peak, and Jacob Peak. Abraham Peak is the tallest at 6,890 feet. The white top of Jacob Peak rises behind the orange rock of Mount Moroni. The Patriarchs were named by Frederick Vining Fisher, a Methodist minister who ventured into Zion in 1916, labeling numerous prominent points in Zion Canyon. He decided to name these three peaks after Old Testament daddies, and the titles stuck.

Patriarchs Peaks Zion
A view of the Patriarchs from the shuttle stop

To get to the trailhead: Between May and October, access to Zion Canyon is restricted to shuttle traffic only. From the Zion National Park Visitor Center, hop on the park shuttle and take it to the third stop, Court of the Patriarchs.

Trailhead address: Floor of the Valley Road (Zion Canyon Scenic Drive), Zion National Park, Springdale, UT 84767
Trailhead coordinates: 37.2370, -112.9606 (37° 14′ 13.2″N 112° 57′ 38.3″W)

Use the map below to view the trail and get directions:

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Tagged with · National Parks · Zion Canyon
Distance: 0.1 miles · Elevation change: 40 feet

4 Comments on Court of the Patriarchs Viewpoint in Zion National Park

  1. Ken Shoufer says:

    Sounds perfect for my grandma.

  2. John says:

    During a recent visit, the shuttle driver was pointng out the “Court of the Patriarchs” and mentioned Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. He then added that in the background your could see Moroni! What in the world is a Moroni? Was this added by the driver or is it official?

  3. ken5at@yahoo.com says:

    are hikers allowed to summit the 3patriarchs?
    is there a trail to do so?

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