Yosemite National Park Campgrounds camping information

is one of the premier areas for outdoor recreation in America and a great place to camp. While there are over 1,600 sites to choose from (once the snow clears), park campgrounds often fill completely. Planning ahead is essential. Many campgrounds in Yosemite National Park take reservations, and in peak summer months, these sites are typically booked far in advance. In particular, you can expect to see the “no vacancy” sign hanging over campgrounds in Yosemite Valley.

Campgrounds in Yosemite Valley (Camp 4 and Upper, Lower, and North Pines Campgrounds) put visitors right in the middle of the action, with quick access to the park’s most famous attractions. For a last minute trip, there are several nice first-come first-serve campgrounds in the high country along Tioga Road north of Yosemite Valley that open from summer to early fall when snow clears. There are two sites south of Yosemite Valley. The furthest from the valley is Wawona Campground, positioned toward the south end of Yosemite National Park, which makes it an easy target for visitors driving up from Southern California. The convenience does not stop once you arrive. Wawona Campground is close to the Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias, Chilnualna Falls, and the historic Wawona Hotel. The drive into Yosemite Valley from Wawona Campground takes about half an hour and passes Tunnel View, one of the most spectacular roadside viewpoints in the park. The commute also passes the turnoff for Glacier Point – also one of the most spectacular viewpoints in the park. Wawona Campground is situated between pristine pine woodlands and the banks of Chilnualna Creek. For tent campers, loops B and C are preferable to loop A.

Yosemite Valley Campground
Upper Pines Campground

When camping in Yosemite National Park, you can expect to find yourself nestled in a pine forest, often next to water. Assuming surrounding sites are respectful, camping in the park can be quite restful and enjoyable. It is safest to make a reservation, which you can do online at hipcamp.com or recreation.gov. If you decide to go for a first-come first-serve site, plan to arrive early. Finding a site can be especially challenging on weekends. There are historic lodges and hotels in the park for those who do not want to camp (especially on chilly winter visits). Check rates and make reservations at tripadvisor.com for other accomodations.

 

Campgrounds in Yosemite National Park

Yosemite Valley

Upper Pines Campground | 238 sites | open year-round | reservations accepted from March to November | $20 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, dump station, and flush toilets | showers nearby | elevation 4,000 feet

Lower Pines Campground | 60 sites | open march through accepted | reservations required | $20 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, dump station, and flush toilets | showers nearby | elevation 4,000 feet

North Pines Campground | 81 sites | open April to September | reservations required | $20 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, dump station, and flush toilets | showers nearby | elevation 4,000 feet

Camp 4 | 35 sites | open year-round | first-come first-serve (arrive early) | $5 per night
potable water, picnic tables, fire pit, shared bear boxes, and flush toilets | showers nearby | elevation 4,000 feet

North of Yosemite Valley

Toulumne Meadows Campground | 315 sites | open from July to September | reservations accepted | $20 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and flush toilets | elevation 8,600 feet

Porcupine Flat Campground | 52 sites | open from July to October | first-come first-serve | $10 per night | picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and vault toilets | no potable water, but nearby stream water is available for treatment | elevation 8,100 feet

Yosemite Creek Campground | 75 sites | tent only | open from July to September | first-come first-serve | $10 per night | picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and vault toilets | no potable water, but nearby stream water is available for treatment | elevation 7,700 feet

White Wolf Campground | 74 sites | open from July to September | first-come first-serve | $14 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and flush toilets | elevation 8,000 feet

Hodgdon Meadow Campground | 105 sites | open year-round | reservations required from May to October | $20 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and flush toilets | elevation 4,900 feet

Tamarack Flat Campground | 52 sites | tent only | open from June to September | first-come first-serve | $10 per night | picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and vault toilets | no potable water, but nearby stream water is available for treatment | elevation 6,300 feet

Crane Flat Campground | 166 sites | open from July to September | reservations required | $20 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and flush toilets | elevation 6,200 feet

South of Yosemite Valley

Bridalveil Creek Campground | 110 sites | open from July to September | first-come first-serve | $14 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and flush toilets | elevation 4,000 feet

Wawona Campground | 238 sites | open year-round | reservations accepted from April to September | $20 per night | potable water, picnic tables, fire rings, bear boxes, and flush toilets | elevation 4,000 feet

 


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Trails and Viewpoints in Yosemite National Park

Trail
Description
Distance
Lat, Long
Hetch Hetchy Wapama Falls150Hetch Hetchy Reservoir and Wapama Falls
This level hike tours a flooded valley to a thundering waterfall in the northwest corner of the park.
5 miles
200 feet
37.946905,
-119.787376
Yosemite May Lake160May Lake
This short east hike visits a peaceful alpine lake in the high elevation region of Yosemite north of Yosemite Valley.
2.4 miles
400 feet
37.832633,
-119.491181
Yosemite Mirror Lake170Mirror Lake
This easy hike visits a relaxing reflective pool on the east end of Yosemite Valley.
2 to 2.8 miles
100 feet
37.747188,
-119.55021
Yosemite Half Dome180Half Dome
This epic hike climbs from Yosemite Valley to the top of the most iconic crest in the Yosemite landscape.
16 miles
4,800 feet
37.747915,
-119.531994
Yosemite Mist Trail190The Mist Trail to Vernal Fall and Nevada Fall
This exciting trail climbs the Merced River past two of Yosemite's prize waterfalls.
1.8 to 6.5 miles
400 to 1,900 feet
37.732178,
-119.558036
Panorama Trail Yosemite200Panorama Trail
This hike travels from Glacier Point down to Yosemite Valley in the most scenic way possible, ending with the Mist Trail.
10 miles (one-way)
3,200 feet
37.727925,
-119.602797
Glacier Point205Glacier Point
This 7,214-foot overlook towers above Yosemite Valley and provides incredible drive-up views.
0.25 miles
50 feet
37.727103,
-119.574456
Lower Yosemite Fall210Lower Yosemite Fall
This electrifying loop delivers visitors to the base of the tallest waterfall in North America.
1.2 miles
100 feet
37.745347,
-119.594777
Yosemite Taft Point220Taft Point
This out and back hike visits an overlook on the south wall of Yosemite Valley with fascinating rock fissures carved into the exposed granite.
4 miles
200 feet
37.7126,
-119.586318
Bridalveil Fall230Bridalveil Fall
This easy paved trail visits the base of a 620-foot single-drop waterfall on the south side of Yosemite Valley.
0.5 miles
50 feet
37.720052,
-119.628682
Tunnel View235Tunnel View
Pull the car over at this extraordinary must see viewpoint looking up Yosemite Valley.
0 miles37.715476,
-119.67678
Chilnualna Falls240Chilnualna Falls
This out and back hike begins near raucous cascades and ends atop a waterfall.
8 miles
2,200 feet
37.548391,
-119.633691
Mariposa Grove250Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias
This hike explores the biggest trees in Yosemite, which can be seen on foot or by tram.
1.6 - 8 miles
400 to 1,200 feet
37.501462,
-119.610862

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